Hawaii Edition
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Feed Feed

Spanking Linked to Mental Health Problems

Impacts Children Later in Life

mikeledray/Shutterstock.com

Spanking—defined as using physical force to control a child’s behavior by inflicting pain, but not injury—can have profound effects on a child later in life, say University of Michigan researchers. Surveying records of 8,300 people that visited outpatient clinics for routine health problems, they found that the 55 percent of those that reported being spanked as children had higher incidences of depression, suicide attempts, drinking and drug use. The finding
is in line with previous studies showing that childhood trauma, abuse and neglect can have long-term health effects.


This article appears in the September 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Dirt Houses Cancer-Protective Microbe

Soil contains bacteria that kills melanoma cancer cells, say Oregon State University researchers.

Doctors Underestimate Opioid Prescriptions

A survey of 109 emergency room doctors found they frequently underestimated how often they prescribed opioids and that they prescribed fewer when alerted to the situation.

Asthma Less Likely to Afflict Breastfed Kids

Dutch children that had been breastfed had a 45 percent lower incidence of asthma later in childhood.

Wild Berries Prove Anti-Cancer Prowess

A naturally occurring compound found abundantly in wild berries increases the cancer-fighting ability of sirtuin 6 enzymes.

Meditation Improves Long-Term Cognition

People that meditated in a three-month retreat enjoyed cognitive gains in sustained attention that lasted to some degree for seven years.

Add your comment: